a tale of a few cities

Elmgreen & Dragset’s Fourth Plinth

Posted in Art, artists, Installation, London, Photography, pictures, Public Art by petercombe on February 22, 2012

The unveiling of London’s Fourth Plinth, Powerless Structures, Fig 101‘ by Scandinavian artistic duo Elmgreen & Dragset starts tomorrow at 9:00am (GMT), in Trafalgar Square.

.

Advertisements

Fantastic Man’s Fantastic Spin

Posted in Art, artists, design, fashion, film, London, Media, music, Photography, Symmetry, Uncategorized, video, video art by petercombe on November 12, 2011

.

Produced by the duo Lernert & Sander for Fantastic Man, these hi-definition films give both incredible grace and pure practicality to the art of moving fashion images. Each video grants a spectacular 360° view on a spectacular athlete wearing a spectacular look. Fashion editorials that transcends the still image and makes beautiful and intelligent use of the internet as platform. Figure skater Thomas Naylor performs the camel spin – a number that is executed by extending one leg backwards with the knee held above the level of the hip. The music for these films truly stands out and was custom-made by composer Danny Calvi from London, UK.  The haunting musical scores keep me retuning to these beautifully shot shorts, music one might hear watching a Lars von Trier film.

Below, Lawrence Evans, a runner-up for the 2014 Winter Olympics, performs an upright catch-foot spin.  

.
Styling: Jodie Barnes. Camera: Bjorn Bratberg. Grooming: Kenichi at Caren. Styling assistance: Joe Porritt. Grooming assistance: Ellie Gill. Editing: Arno Ouwejan. Production: Serena Noorani. Executive production: Stephen Whelan. Postproduction: The Mill.Five films were produced in all. THE FANTASTIC MAN SERIES BY LERNERT & SANDER won the Best Art Direction Prize at «A Shaded View on Fashion Film» (ASVOFF) held in October at Centre Pompidou in Paris. ASVOFF includes a film selection & competition, documentaries, features and installations. 

Christo, Over the River

Christo, moments after I asked whether anybody had ever called him the first wrap artist. Tate Britain, 14.09.2011

.

Christo, Over the River (Project for Arkansas River, State of Colorado), Drawing 2010 in two parts, 15 x 96″ and 42 x 96″ (38 x 244 cm and 106.6 x 244 cm), Pencil, pastel, charcoal, wax crayon, enamel paint, wash, fabric sample, hand-drawn topographic map and technical data (Photo: André Grossmann) © 2010 Christo

.

Federal regulators on Monday approved a $50 million installation of anchored fabric over the Arkansas River in southern Colorado by the artist Christo, whose larger-than-life vision has divided environmentalists, residents and politicians for years over questions of aesthetics, nature and economic impact.

The project, “Over the River,” will include eight suspended panel segments totaling 5.9 miles along a 42-mile stretch of the river, about three hours southwest of Denver. Construction could begin next year, pending final local approvals, with the goal being a two-week display of the work as early as August 2014.

Christo’s projects — from the wrapping of the Reichstag Parliament building in Berlin in 1995 to “The Gates,” a meandering path of orange awnings through Central Park in New York in 2005 — have often generated heated debate in advance of their creation.

“We are elated,” Christo said. “Every artist in the world likes his or her work to make people think. Imagine how many people were thinking, how many professionals were thinking and writing in preparing that environmental impact statement.” [NYTimes]

This past September, Christo gave a rare talk in London about two works in progress, Over the River, Project for the Arkansas River, State of Colorado and The Mastaba, Project for the United Arab Emirates. He talked about the concepts behind these two artworks, and the significant process of production and realisation when working on large-scale environmental artworks. I was lucky enough to be sitting in the 2nd row center, it just so happened that he sat directly in front of me narrating while slides of his projects were projected on stage. He spoke much about the Over the River project but I was most intrigued by The Mastaba project (a monumental artwork, set in the Abu Dhabi desert, to be made of approximately 410,000 horizontally stacked oil barrels). I had always thought The Mastaba had been abandoned so was delighted to hear that it is an artwork still in preparatory stages.

During question time I asked how one might volunteer to work on one of his projects (48:55). He immediately pointed out that everybody working on his projects is paid since you could not fire volunteers. Jeanne-Claude (his now deceased wife), made sure that laboring help was paid 25% above minimum wage. I was amazed at Christo’s energy and level of enthusiasm, being that he is 76 years old.

Artist’s Talk: Christo, Tate Britain, Wednesday 14 September 2011
.

The London Open

Posted in Art, Artist call, artists, contests, Exhibitions, London by petercombe on October 20, 2011

The London Open is a snapshot of the latest art from London in 2012. This new incarnation of the Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial open submission exhibition is open to all artists aged 26 or over living and working in the London postal district (i.e. N, NW, SW, SE, W, WC, E and EC postcodes). The first edition of The London Open is selected by writer Patricia Bickers, artist Rodney Graham, collector Jack Kirkland, curator Marta Kuzma and Kirsty Ogg, curator, Whitechapel Gallery.

For the Application Form you will need:

– Your personal details (name, address, email address, telephone number, date of birth);
– A one page A4 CV set in minimum type font 10;
– Your 500 word personal statement;
– Up to 5 examples of your practice in the form of images, web-links or a combination of both (plus details – title, medium, dimensions/duration, date);
– £25 application fee.

Open for submissions
3 October-25 November 2011

Exhibition
4 July-14 September 2012

Image: Design by The 2 Group 2011

Click here to apply now.

Christies: Yves Klein, Victoire de Samothrace

Posted in Art, artists, auction, London, paris, Sculpture, Uncategorized by petercombe on September 9, 2011


Yves Klein (1928-1962)
Victoire de Samothrace

Estimate

    £35,000 – £55,000

  • ($55,755 – $87,615)

Incised with the artist’s initials and dated ‘YK 62’ (on the right wing); numbered ‘EA I/XXV’ (on the reverse and the underside of the stone)
dry blue pigment in synthetic resin on plaster with a metal and stone base
19¾ x 10½ x 10in. (50.2 x 26.7 x 25.4cm.)
Executed in 1962, this work is HC number one from an edition of one hundred and seventy-five plus twenty-five HC edited by Galerie Karl Flinker LC, Paris.

I saw this in the Christies window in South Kensington, London this evening. The photo does it no justice at all. Set to auction during their Post-War & Contemporary Art sale on the 14th, Sept., it was a jewel to behold. A heavenly apparition.

Christo talk @ Tate Britain

Posted in Art, artists, Collage, Conceptual Art, environmental art, London, Sculpture, Work on Paper by petercombe on August 17, 2011

Christo, The Mastaba in comparison to the Great Pyramid of Giza (Pyramid of Cheops), Egypt

.

I’ve booked my ticket to see Christo talk at Tate Britain. Secretly, I’d love a months long gig working on the team with Christo.

New York-based environmental artist Christo gives a rare talk in London about two works in progress, Over the River, Project for the Arkansas River, State of Colorado and The Mastaba, Project for the United Arab Emirates. Christo is renowned for his often controversial public artworks carried out with his late partner Jeanne-Claude. These include the monumental wrapping of the Reichstag in Berlin and the Pont Neuf in Paris, the 24-mile long Running Fence in California, and most recently, The Gates in New York City’s Central Park.

For Over the River, initially conceptualised in 1992, Christo plans to suspend nearly six miles of silvery, luminous fabric panels high above the Arkansas River, along a 42-mile stretch between Salida and Cañon City in south-central Colorado.

The Mastaba has been in development from 1977. This monumental artwork, set in the Abu Dhabi desert, will be made of approximately 410,000 horizontally stacked oil barrels.

In this lecture Christo, who has generously contributed his time, will talk about the concepts behind these two artworks, and the significant process of production and realisation when working on large-scale environmental artworks.

Wednesday 14 September 2011, 18.30–20.00
Tate Britain  Auditorium
£12 (£9 concessions), booking recommended
For tickets book online
or call 020 7887 8888.

Ai Weiwei and the Five Finger Discount

Posted in appropriation, Art, auction, China, Conceptual Art, illustration, London, Painting, Sculpture by petercombe on July 19, 2011

Detail of Ai Wei Wei sunflower seeds from the Tate Modern in London

For the eleventh commission in the Tate Modern‘s Unilever Series, Chinese conceptual artist Ai Weiwei had filled the museum’s Turbine Hall with millions of life-sized sunflower seed husks made out of porcelain. The collective effort of a number of specialists from Jingdezhen, China, the hand-crafted seeds were individually formed and painted. Before the museum was alerted to the installation’s dangers of lead paint and silica dust, visitors were encouraged to touch and walk on the carpet of tiny replicates. Before a barrier was erected around the perimeter of the installation, I wondered how many visitors were tempted to pilfer samples of the tiny seeds (see photo above). In February of this year Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Evening sale in London surpassed the $192,000 estimate, netting $559,394 for a 100-kilogram pile of Weiwei’s seeds. That puts worth of the stolen seeds pictured above at about $33.60.

Raven Row, Gone With The Wind

Posted in Art, artists, Conceptual Art, Group Show, London, Photography, Sculpture, silkscreen, sound art by petercombe on June 30, 2011

.

top right, Walter Marchetti, Musica da Camera N° 182, 1989/2011 (photo by Fabrizio Garghetti)
middle, Opening night viewers take in Takehisa Kosugi’s Ear Drum Event, 1962/75 (photo Mandy Williams)
bottom left, Mandy Williams, Lost voices, 2010, Audio installation
bottom right, Walter Marchetti, Musica da camera N° 211, 1990/2011 (photo Rupix)
.

Gone With The Wind is curated by Ed Baxter, director of Resonance104.4fm. The London art radio station took its quarters at Raven Row for the duration of the exhibition, broadcasting, and hosting workshops and live events, as well as presenting an ‘overhung’ sound installation – the ‘Resonance Open’ – with contributions solicited from local and international sound artists.

Gone with the Wind remains open until 17 July 2011 at the Raven Row gallery in London.

In-depth Review >

Kristin Posehn, A Bridge Between Two Rooms

Posted in architecture, Art, artists, engineering, London, Photography, Sculpture by petercombe on June 28, 2011

.

Kristin Posehn, A Bridge Between Two Rooms, 2005 – 2010

top installation view (Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht NL)
left stop and search citation received under the UK Terrorism Act 2000
right single photograph of a block of windows

.

Between 2005 and 2008 Kristin Posehn photographed every window of the the skyscraper at 30 St Mary’s Axe, London, otherwise known as the Gherkin, from street level. The digital photographs were later reworked, their perspective and dimensions corrected and printed out separately. These diamond-shaped photographs were then attached to their neighbors using 1420 translucent photo-clips and a bike wheel, forming a completely hollow self-supporting shell. The shell structure was hung from floor to ceiling in a standard suburban-type bedroom, lit from within as a lampshade.  

It must be noted that while photographing the building Posehn was given a stop and search citation (received under the UK Terrorism Act 2000).

The sheer feat of engineering coupled with Posehn’s mathematical knowhow really is something to behold. Posehn’s preciseness and attention to detail far surpasses the imaginable. I really would have loved to have seen this work in person. 

A Bridge Between Two Rooms >

Anish Kapoor Blows Off UK Now

Posted in Art, artists, boycott, China, London, Photography, politics, protests by petercombe on June 16, 2011

(Photo: Johnny Shand-Kydd)


LONDON. Anish Kapoor has cancelled plans to present his sculptures at the National Museum of China in Beijing, in protest against the continuing detention of Ai Weiwei. He had been asked by the British Council to consider a show at the newly renovated museum in Tiananmen Square as part the “UK Now” festival in China late next year.

Kapoor’s spokeswoman confirmed to The Art Newspaper that he had been invited to China, but “he is not going to proceed in view of the detention of Ai Weiwei.” Ai, an outspoken critic of the Chinese government, was arrested in Beijing in early April for alleged “economic crimes”.

Discussions began about a potential exhibition at the National Museum of China last October, when two directors of London’s Lisson Gallery (which represents Kapoor, stand 2.1/K12 at Art Basel) were in Beijing. Provisional plans were subsequently made for Kapoor to travel to Beijing this month to view the space and talk with the museum. The idea would have been to mount an exhibition with a major new work.

Kapoor has been outspoken in his criticism of the Chinese government’s treatment of Ai Weiwei, since his detention on 3 April. On 10 May, when he opened his Leviathan installation at the Grand Palais in Paris, he dedicated it to the Chinese artist, describing his detention as “barbaric”. Once Kapoor had spoken out, it was realised that his participation in the “UK Now” festival would be difficult. A British Council spokeswoman stressed that the exhibition proposal had been at “a very early stage, and until he had seen the space we could not have proceeded”.

British Council chief executive Martin Davidson believes in “freedom of cultural expression”, but is keen for the programme to go ahead. He commented: “It is through cultural exchange that we best demonstrate the benefits of free artistic expression and build supportive links between people in the UK and China.”

The Art Newspaper >
%d bloggers like this: