a tale of a few cities

Visual AIDS, Postcards From the Edge, NYC

I am in such good company here – who doesn’t  recognize a Marilyn Minter when they see one?

Visual AIDS utilizes art to fight AIDS by provoking dialogue, supporting HIV+ artists, and preserving a legacy, because AIDS is not over. Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to HIV prevention and AIDS awareness through producing and presenting visual art projects, while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS.

Postcards From the Edge is a unique fundraiser where each of the 1,500+ postcard-sized artworks are uniformly priced at only $85.00. All works are displayed anonymously, with the artis’s identity revealed only after the work is purchased. Featuring artworks by Jeff Koons, Yoko Ono, John Waters, Donald Baechler, Marilyn Minter, Ed Ruscha, Polly Apfelbaum, Adam Fuss, Kiki Smith, John Baldessari, Louise Fishman, Ross Bleckner, Barry McGee, Kay Rosen, Marcel Dzama, Jonathan Lasker, Mary Heilmann, Louise Lawler, Bill Jensen, Jane Hammond, Ann Hamilton, Hans Haacke, William Wegman, Kate Shepherd, Zoe Leonard, Jack Pierson, Lawrence Weiner, Pat Steir, Thomas Woodruff and over 1450 others.

There will be a Preview Party Friday, January 6 from 6 – 8 p.m. The Benefit Sale of postcard-sized art begins on Saturday, January 7th from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and continues through Sunday, January 8th from Noon until 4 p.m.

For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit VisualAIDS.

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My Submission to Postcards from the Edge, NYC

Peter Combe, Damien Hirst at SFMOMA, 2011 

Above is my submission to Postcards from the Edge, NYC. When I saw Andy Bosselman’s photo of San Francisco based artist, Xiang Gao outside SFMOMA – I cracked up and knew I wanted to incorporate Damien Hirst‘s noggin.

Postcards from the Edge is an exhibit and benefit sale of over 1500 one-of-a-kind postcard-size works of art by established and emerging artists. All artworks at Postcards from the Edge benefit are exhibited anonymously. The works are signed on the back only and though viewers receive a list of all participating artists, they don’t know who created which piece until purchased.

Postcards from the Edge will be hosted at Cheim & Read from January 6-8, 2012

Visual AIDS utilizes art to fight AIDS by provoking dialogue and supporting HIV+ artists.

visualAIDS

2011/2001

Peter Combe Parallels, Maurizio Cattelan: All, Guggenheim Museum, 2011/Stanley Kubrick, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

I couldn’t help but see the parallels.

Thanks to @Guggenheim for sending this blogpost into the Twittersphere, and to SFMOMA for featuring it on their blog.

Update Nov 28: Sadly the @Guggenheim Ow.ly link has now now fails since I changed my Blog URL a few days ago not realizing previous incoming links would fail. I did however get a hefty 1,000 very appreciated hits before the change.

 

 

.sfmoma-1

gugg

Occupy Wall Street @ Sotheby’s lock out

Fleet Week as seen yesterday in North Beach, San Francisco

Posted in Peter Combe Art, Photography, San Francisco by petercombe on October 9, 2011

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Peter Combe, Fleet Week as seen today in North Beach, San Francisco, (iPhone 4), 2011

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LANCER/LANCEL

Posted in Art, Collage, Peter Combe Art, Photography by petercombe on October 9, 2011
Peter Combe, LANCER/LANCEL, 2011
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PeterCom.be

Posted in Art, artists, Collage, Conceptual Art, cut & paste, guerilla art, Peter Combe Art, Photography, text, Work on Paper by petercombe on September 26, 2011

A work in progress with more to come soon, my new website is up at petercom.be 

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Currently, I am in London

Peter Combe, London Bridge, T, 2011

Le bois a trouvé dans Nestlé

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Peter Combe, ‘Nest, le bois‘, 2011

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Another altered logo inspired by the rampant use of cellulose (wood pulp), by the leading producers of processed foods, this particular design attributed to the guilty culprit, Nestlé. Wood pulp is used as an extender whose use in a roster of food products, from crackers and ice creams to puddings and baked goods, is now being exposed. What you’re actually paying for – and consuming – may be surprising.

Cellulose is virgin wood pulp that has been processed and manufactured to different lengths for functionality, though use of it and its variant forms (cellulose gum, powdered cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, etc.) is deemed safe for human consumption, according to the FDA, which regulates most food industry products.  The government agency sets no limit on the amount of cellulose that can be used in food products meant for human consumption.

Humans are unable to digest cellulose since we lack the appropriate enzymes to break it down. This is a food adulterant and another example of the wholly corrupt nature of the federal agency responsible for food safety but continues to prove itself more concerned with corporate profit. More >

ˈwoŏdˌkraft

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The following is a snippet from Food Freedom‘s article on wood as a food additive. I couldn’t resist playing around with the corporate logos of the guilty food producers.

The recent class-action lawsuit brought against Taco Bell raised questions about the quality of food many Americans eat each day.

Chief among those concerns is the use of cellulose (read: wood pulp), an extender whose use in a roster of food products, from crackers and ice creams to puddings and baked goods, is now being exposed. What you’re actually paying for — and consuming — may be surprising. Kraft Foods, General Mills, and Jack in the Box, Nestlé and Kellogs are just a few of the food producers that save as much as 30% in ingredient costs by opting for cellulose as a filler or binder in processed foods. [Note: Humans are unable to digest cellulose]. More >

 

Peter Combe, ‘ˈwoŏdˌkraft’, ‘Lumberjack in the box’, ‘General Pulp Mills’, 2011
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