a tale of a few cities

Oscars, Best Dressed

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Dietch Projects SF, New Art In The Streets

Up until yesterday I was having a lot of fun being friends with Jeffrey Dietch on Facebook. I was a little slow to cotton-on to the joke, but when I did, I thought it brilliant. There appeared on his Facebook wall, a photo of a fellow sitting looking very smart in a cavernous, modern, all white interior above the heading, ‘Getting the space ready for San Francisco opening.‘ ‘LMAO!‘, was my response and contribution to the comment thread. After clicking the notification that Jeffrey Dietch liked my comment, I was returned to this page. The Facebook profile had been shut down. All sorts of artists had friended Dietch and posted on his wall, thinking him to be Jeffrey Deitch of the eponymous SoHo gallery, Deitch Projects. (Owner Jeffrey Deitch closed his gallery to the public in June 2010 as a result of being appointed  director of L.A.’s MoCA).

I thought the whole Dietch Projects SF to be a wonderful guerrilla stunt. Some didn’t, as evinced by a writer at New York based Blog Mixed Greens. The writer at Mixed Greens mentions Dietch Projects SF logo being ‘ripped off‘ from the original.  Wtf? – how can you ‘rip-off‘ a logo that’s already been ripped off? The writer suggested that Fake Deitch was responsible. I thought that a lame scapegoat but figured I’d pursue @FakeDeitch to prove Mixed Green’s wayward hunch wrong.

I love Dietch Projects SF’s promotional photo (top), snatched from Chicks With Steve Buscemeyes.

Heading out to Gallery Heist tomorrow evening anyway, I’ll probably mosey over to 441 O’Farrell to check things out. 

Dietch Projects SF
New Art In The Streets
Dec 8 – Jan 6
441 O’Farrell Street,
San Francisco 94102
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UPDATE Dec 9: Went down to 441 O’Farrell last night, turned out that was the Ever Gold address. Next door sat large construction hoarding plastered with ‘UNDER CONSTRUCTION SORRY FOR THE INCONVENIENCE & the Dietz Projects logo (with an address change of 445 O’Farrell). It was pretty funny, the hoarding, about 10ft high stuck out roughly 15ft to the curb and I’d say it was about 20ft wide in front of a low rent hotel. Pedestrians jostled dutifully between the protruding structure and the curb. A friend and I spotted a fellow being admitted into the hotel so we slipped in behind him and ventured into the main lobby area to catch a glimpse through the front window (backside of the hoarding). It was simply a false front completely void of any construction. A total stunt. Staff at the grotty Hotel whose frontage was completely obscured seemed oblivious to the fact. Especially hilarious was a clerk yelling at us from a far away front desk in the dimly lit cavernous lobby of what must have been a grand-ish hotel in it’s time, asking us what we were doing there. We were taking pictures. He looked bemused – stunt – what stunt? It was as if he were utterly incognizant of the hotel’s current frontage. Even so, the artwork lived up to its namesake, ‘New Art In The Streets’. I figure Ever Gold artist Jeremiah Jenkins was responsible for the Guerilla installation. I could be wrong.


Artral Media’s China Syndrome

Posted in Digital Natives, Media, social media, Twitter, Vancouver, Wordsworth by petercombe on April 8, 2011

Sixty messages were created for Digital Natives, a public artwork sited on the electronic billboard at Burrard Street Bridge in downtown Vancouver. Three have been omitted by the corporation that is under contract to manage the billboard’s content, Astral Media Outdoor. Omitted messages are presented here, in solidarity with artist Edgar Heap of Birds and writer Larissa Lai. Other Sights for Artists’ Projects is dismayed at the exclusion of work by such respected artists.

Curators Clint Burnham and Lorna Brown state, “Our goals for the project are to use this highly visible location to present a conversation between First Nations and non-First Nations contributors and the public – happening on twitter, on our website, and on the billboard itself, as tweets from the public will be introduced in mid-April. In this anniversary year, we are drawing attention to the messages and languages we usually see in public space, and those we do not. We are disappointed that Astral has refused to broadcast artworks by such renowned artists. Their decision compromises the intent of the project and does a disservice to the artists, whose viewpoints about public space are highly valued.

“Unfortunately,” they add, “Astral’s censoring of artists and writers shows how difficult it is for Canadians to gain access to public space, and to express themselves in public space. This is an issue of censorship, of the suppression of artistic expression, clear and simple.”

from Digital Natives, Public Language Trouble

Astral Media’s Social Responsibility Page >

Corporate Emails >

Other Sights for Artists’ Projects’ Digital Natives is a public artwork sited on the electronic billboard at Burrard Street Bridge in downtown Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Digital Natives, Twitter, Public Art & The Skwxwú7mesh Nation

Posted in Digital Natives, Media, social media, text, Twitter, Vancouver, Wordsworth by petercombe on April 6, 2011

Digital Natives
April 4 – 30, 2011
Electronic Billboard
Burrard Street Bridge
Vancouver, BC
Canada

Other Sights for Artists’ Projects is pleased to announce Digital Natives, a public artwork sited on the electronic billboard at the Burrard Street Bridge.

Curators Lorna Brown and Clint Burnham have invited artists and writers from across North America to contribute messages to be broadcast over the month of April, coinciding with the 125th Anniversary of the City of Vancouver.

Digital Natives intervenes in the physical, social and historical context of the site, the billboard and the city with a series of ten second text messages interrupting the rotation of advertisements. Taking the form of Twitter messages, invited contributors respond to the site’s charged history, the ten-second format and the 140-character limit of tweets. The sign itself becomes an artistic and literary space for exchange between native and non-native communities exploring how language is used in advertising, its tactical role in colonization, and as a complex vehicle of communication.

The Vancouver Courier reports that the project hit a roadblock just as it was about to go live this week when Astral Media asked for translations of the messages it was given two weeks ago and initially held back 25 of the posts, according to Burnham. As a result, messages in Squamish weren’t seen on Squamish land where the billboards are rooted, and the Kwak’wala message that included English Twitter-speak “OMG” for oh my God wasn’t posted.

Encouraging dialogue among artists and writers, between First Nations and non-First Nations communities, and between artists, writers and the public, Digital Natives is public art that the public not only ‘receives’, but may also produce. Local and remote audiences are welcome to tweet their messages to @diginativ, and they will be considered for broadcast.

Check out the billboard as a medium

The Vancouver Courier article here


Peter Combe, THIS IS NOT A LOVE SONG, 2011


PETER COMBE, I DO / SVP

Peter CombeI DO / SVP, 2011

M/M (Paris) is approaching 9,000 Facebook fans…and who wants a free bottle of M/MINK?

I DO, SVP

LINK >

Mubarak Resigns

Posted in Art, Graphic Design, I appropriate, Peter Combe Art, Peter Combe Design, social media, t-shirts by petercombe on February 11, 2011

Peter CombeWalk Like an Egyptian, 2010 (proposed T-Shirt design © Peter Combe)

(Reuters) – A furious wave of protest finally swept Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak from power on Friday after 30 years of one-man rule, sparking jubilation on the streets and sending a warning to autocrats across the Arab world and beyond.

Social media has certainly contributed to Egypt’s fight for democracy and Mubarak’s resignation.

I had been working on the above design for the past few days with the hopes of producing a T-Shirt that would raise money for a charity whose aim was to help those in Egypt who have been displaced or put through increased financial hardship due to the past 3 weeks of unrest .

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