a tale of a few cities

Mubarak Resigns

Posted in Art, Graphic Design, I appropriate, Peter Combe Art, Peter Combe Design, social media, t-shirts by petercombe on February 11, 2011

Peter CombeWalk Like an Egyptian, 2010 (proposed T-Shirt design © Peter Combe)

(Reuters) – A furious wave of protest finally swept Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak from power on Friday after 30 years of one-man rule, sparking jubilation on the streets and sending a warning to autocrats across the Arab world and beyond.

Social media has certainly contributed to Egypt’s fight for democracy and Mubarak’s resignation.

I had been working on the above design for the past few days with the hopes of producing a T-Shirt that would raise money for a charity whose aim was to help those in Egypt who have been displaced or put through increased financial hardship due to the past 3 weeks of unrest .

ig•nis mu•bar•ak•u•us

Posted in All is not as it seems., appropriation, Art, Cairo, Photography, Wordsworth, WTF? by petercombe on February 10, 2011

ig•nis mu•bar•ak•u•us |igˈnəs moōbärˈæk’ū-əs|

noun (plural igˈnəs moōbärˈæk·u·i /ˈigˈnəs moōbärˈæk’o͞oˌī/),

something deceptive or deluding (on a grand scale).

adjective,

used to describe the narcissistic & delusional dictator’s trait of (preoccupation with) chasing rainbows.

gut feeling,

also known as externating one’s inner disgust.

early 21st century: modern Latin, derived  from dictator Hosni Mubarak’s spotting of Cairo’s rainbow filled sky & his ‘WTF?’ Feb,  10,  2011 speech for Egypt.

see also: ignis fatuus (ig·nis fat·u·us)

Take the Time to Read This Moving and Harrowing Account of Cairo & Share This With as Many People as Possible

Posted in Cairo, Photography by petercombe on February 4, 2011

Mariam A., Square of Angels

I just came back from Tahrir Square on my way to ease the horrible sense of guilt I felt for not having been there with them during the dark hours when they were being mercilessly attacked by the mercenaries…

My friend and I thought those heroes needed food, water, and medical supplies; however, upon reaching there, we realized they had all had their breakfast (consisting of dry bread and cheese mostly, not Kentucky) and that they had already been supplied with rather more bandage than we provided!

NOT by foreigners, not by hamas, not by MBs, not by Israelis or even Martians… they were already provided by those things because God is great in his most gracious way has managed to send out people like me who could make it earlier….

Despite the ruins, and the massive injuries, I had a very soothing sense that I was in heaven… for the first time in my life the sight of blood did not turn my stomach, for the first time in my life the the smell of horse pee (near the entrances) or that coming out from public restrooms did not make me gasp for air or feel sick!!!!

I was among ANGELS, not human beings… I was surrounded by people with a spirit higher than the sky, THANKING ME, ME!!!!!!!! I did all I can to smile at them, and thank them, and pray for them when all I wanted to do was weep and hide in their arms, and kneel to kiss their feet for making me feel so safe in a place so ruined and destroyed, for making my tense muscles relax after a long night of hysteric crying!!

They were not thanking us for the little food we brought or the few bandage rolls that could fit in my bag… they were thanking me for believing in them, for having swollen eyes that cried for them… for asking them if they had breakfast yet!

I dared not ask them how they were; I was afraid I’d cry and get them down when all they had done was get me up!! One of them asked me and my friend  as his face beamed with a smile “why did you come?“… my friend said “because this is our country…“, I looked him in the eye and resisted hugging him as I answered “because YOU are my country“… and they are, Oh God, they are the country I have been looking for my entire life and I finally found it… I found it praying for me and it made me feel like I was safe beyond any harm… the only real harm is the fear that I would lose them to those bastards BASTARDS who try to massacre them when they were so peaceful and unarmed and mostly gracious!!!

One of the women around me who also arrived early this morning like me to help and to find redemption and refuge stood there and kept shouting at the top of her lungs at the army soldiers in their tanks “TRAITORS, BASTARDS, DIRT BAGS” I felt like joining her, I felt like spitting at them… YET, those injured yet high-spirited men asked her politely to stop, then they even apologized to the Army soldiers saying the most adorable Egyptian phrase “7a2ak 3alaya“… They even shared the breakfast they had already had before we made it there with those Army soldiers who stood there all night and watched them fall all around without moving a muscle to protect them… WHO DOES THAT???? Certainly not those who were sitting safe in their homes, either completely ignorant or consumed by pain like me and those who share my feelings… I wanted to snatch the necks of those soldiers, but seeing those people defending them made me respect and honor their wishes, so I wiped away the nasty look I was giving that Army Soldier as he was biting THEIR bread, yet still, I refused to offer him food…

They were smiling faces who welcomed me and apologized for searching me… they thanked me as they refused to take more food than they needed to eat, and pointed to a far away direction saying “our brothers over there have not yet, perhaps“… when I told them “where can I find those who have not eaten“, they smiled at me and thanked me and my friend and prayed even more for us! And when I walked too close to Abdel Moneim Riad Square, the line of fire, one of the men asked me to “stay safe” as he offered to take the food to his brothers at that end, to keep me safe!

Before we got in, as I was calling one of the amazing guys who spent the night there to ask where “our people” were to feel safe, he just said “you will know them, they show“… as I told him in a shaky tone of voice “it’s hard to tell“, I suddenly felt that strange yet very fulfilling sense of security taking all over me as I saw their faces… It was NOT how they looked, it was the aura that surrounded them…

While I was there, I heard that horrific sound of metal clashing, the sign they have amongst them that an intruder is trying to get in… my friend tried to grab me away from the commotion… but I stood still feeling absolutely no fear… I was CERTAIN no one can touch me or harm me as I stood there between those who had sweat and bled all night for my safety while i was sitting on my bed doing nothing but wailing words on my FB account and feeling utter shame.

Those people DO NOT need food or medical supplies half as much as they need our constant and most dedicated support, and presence by their side when the night approaches and those murderers attack them… But most importantly, they DESERVE our utter and complete RESPECT…

As we were walking home, after having passed the secured areas, I began to feel less safe and rather more skeptical of every one walking around me… when a man in a Blue Elantra approached us asking where we had come from, I said “Tahrir Square“, he asked “and who are you”, I found myself smiling in the same spirit they left me with as I very calmly (yet secretly doubtfully) asking him “and who are you?”, he said “are you those who are protesting?“… I smiled even more and told him “those who are protesting are much much better than me, I am only here hoping to help, but who are you with?“, he said “I am with Egypt“, I pointed towards the end of the street that leads to Tahrir Square and told him “Egypt is right there“…

I collapsed and cried my heart out the moment I stepped home… I have sobbed to at least 4 of my friends after my mom and sister sat to hear me as I told the story just like above to make their voice heard because it’s the very least I should do… I bid you all to pray for them… I could not tell their faiths, their socials classes, their educational backgrounds… they all looked the same with their tired yet hopeful faces, with their injured bodies yet healing souls… they looked like a country I would have loved to stay in

If it weren’t for my two sons, I would have stayed there and never left until either Mubarak left or until I had died there between MY PEOPLE, MY FAMILY, My BROTHERS AND UNCLES AND THOUSAND DIFFERENT VERSIONS OF MY FATHER… I would have rather died there with them than face the fear of living a shameful unsafe life among those who doubt them or say what they would have done had they been in their shoes…

I felt like millions of arms were holding my soul safe and sound, and giving me a sense of peace and tranquility I had never experienced before… And now, my heart, my body and my soul are shaking because I left that safety behind as I returned home, I left it there for fear to fill its place, fear of losing those people… fear, and massive disappointment that those people are being called so many bad things they are most definitely NOT…

Today, I have seen Angels in shape of humans… I have seen heaven in the midst of ruins… I am so close right now to faith and yet so close to losing it…

God, please PLEASE be there for them to keep them safe and sound… God, please protect them and shield them from all harm… God please don’t let them go in vain… God please change the hearts of those who are in their homes judging and condemning them and send your angels to fight for them…

Until I went today, I only knew few people who were there by name and a friend for whom I was concerned… but as I left there, I left a huge part of me that I know I will always always miss…

I could not change or sleep even though I had not slept in more than 24 hours before I shared this with everyone who can read it… may my words be of use, may those who read my words feel the way I feel right now..

by: Mariam A., Single Mother of Two Living in Cairo, Thursday, February 3, 2011 at 3:24am, Cairo

UPDATE: Friday, February 4, 2011 at 12:25pm, An Overdue Acknowledgement… >

Added note: While communicating with Mariam through Facebook, and her not knowing that my sister is now safe in England, Marium offered to go to the Maadi district to see that she was ok. The heart knows no bounds.

Photos Timothy E. Kaldas

Nice to see it show up on Twitter

Posted in Twitter by petercombe on January 31, 2011

Must be an omen since my sister and family are due to fly British Airways to the UK today.

My Expat Family in Cairo, Egypt

Posted in Cairo by petercombe on January 30, 2011

Maadi, Cairo

It certainly has been a stressful last couple of days for me, my family and friends of my sister, her husband and my nephews in Cairo. Saturday evening was chaos in the Maadi (Cairo district where they live). Much looting, vigilantes on the streets, gunshots, violence, and a state of panic throughout the night. At one point fears were so intense that my sister and family prepared themselves (with money tucked in socks, the children in their prams) to flee for their lives. The building security guard, his family and friends and the building owner stood guard outside the building with weapons in hand. My sister was in tears on the phone with me when expressing the kindness of the Egyptians. The reputation of Muslims has suffered during much of the last decade with little in the way of reports of their kindness, bravery and loyalty such as what was displayed last night. She is eternally grateful to them and feels that they awoke alive Sunday morning due to the bravery of those who stood outside protecting the building.

Flight to the UK was booked for Monday and to be quite honest we all wondered whether they would be able to hold out until then since the chaos has been escalating so rapidly. It turns out my brother in law’s office booked them a flight to Bahrain today (Sunday). There was a mad scramble to collect things and get to the airport. Tim drove I believe. It was the last of contact with them since we’d all been communicating through their landline telephone. The void felt through lack of communication (whether or not they made it safely to the airport) was unbearable. Thankfully a friend of theirs in the UK managed to get through to Tim via his cellphone. Cellphones seem to be working sporadically. Their flight is due to depart in 50 minutes (1pm Cairo time), they are being denied boarding since they do not have proof of an e-ticket and since systems are down at airport there is no proof of them being passengers (internet down / flight purchase was made from Tim’s office in the UK). Thank god for Monday’s flight option on British Airways purchased by my sister (in law) based in the UK. I’m now hearing that there is more madness at the airport and that they have been directed by the British Foreign Service (through a very helpful friend of their’s in the UK whose been orchestrating cellular phone contact) to locate UK Embassy officials who are now at the airport.

FCO has recommended that those unable to board flights return home until flights become available. They have had to return to Maadi district of Cairo where residents have formed vigilante groups in defence since much looting and chaos in the evenings is taking place. In the Maadi area south of Cairo, neighbourhood mosques called on young men over loudspeakers to come down to the entrances of building and homes to ward off looters.Their driver has offered to stay with them this evening to provide protection. They will try previously booked flight for UK on British Airways Monday.

They are in Maadi  now, things are a little surreal – the vegetable man called and has made a delivery to their home.

An excellent livestream of the situation in Egypt >

My Sister interviewed on BBC 5 – Jan/30>

2nd Interview on BBC 5 – Jan/30>

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Acropolis Museum Needs to Hire Zahi Hawass

Posted in Art by petercombe on October 10, 2009

Elgin_Marbles_east_pediment

The Parthenon Marbles

The Acropolis Museum in Greece needs to get a little more savvy in it’s approach regarding its desire to have the Parthenon Marbles, aka the Elgin marbles, returned from the British Museum in the UK. The museum could start by hiring Zahi Hawass (mentioned below in a Huffington Post article by Angela Charlton), as consultant.

PARIS — France’s culture minister agreed Friday to return five painted wall fragments to Egypt after a row over their ownership prompted the Egyptians to cut ties with the Louvre Museum.

A committee of 35 specialists unanimously recommended that France give back the painted wall fragments from a 3,200-year-old tomb near the ancient temple city of Luxor.
Culture Minister Frederic Mitterrand “immediately decided to follow this recommendation,” his office said in a statement. It was not clear when France would send the fragments back to Egypt.
Mitterrand said the items were acquired by the Louvre in “good faith” and that the decision to return them reflects France’s and the Louvre’s commitment of “resolute action against illegal trafficking of cultural goods.”

Egypt’s antiquities chief Zahi Hawass described the disputed fragments as pieces of a burial fresco showing the nobleman Tetaki’s journey to the afterlife.
Hawass took his campaign to recover the nation’s lost treasures to a new level Wednesday by cutting ties with the Louvre over the artifacts. It was the most aggressive effort yet by Hawass, Egypt’s tough and media-savvy chief archaeologist, to reclaim what he says are antiquities stolen from the country and purchased by leading world museums.

Read more at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/10/09/france-to-return-stolen-e_n_315402.html

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