a tale of a few cities

My Submission to Postcards from the Edge, NYC

Peter Combe, Damien Hirst at SFMOMA, 2011 

Above is my submission to Postcards from the Edge, NYC. When I saw Andy Bosselman’s photo of San Francisco based artist, Xiang Gao outside SFMOMA – I cracked up and knew I wanted to incorporate Damien Hirst‘s noggin.

Postcards from the Edge is an exhibit and benefit sale of over 1500 one-of-a-kind postcard-size works of art by established and emerging artists. All artworks at Postcards from the Edge benefit are exhibited anonymously. The works are signed on the back only and though viewers receive a list of all participating artists, they don’t know who created which piece until purchased.

Postcards from the Edge will be hosted at Cheim & Read from January 6-8, 2012

Visual AIDS utilizes art to fight AIDS by provoking dialogue and supporting HIV+ artists.

visualAIDS

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2011/2001

Peter Combe Parallels, Maurizio Cattelan: All, Guggenheim Museum, 2011/Stanley Kubrick, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

I couldn’t help but see the parallels.

Thanks to @Guggenheim for sending this blogpost into the Twittersphere, and to SFMOMA for featuring it on their blog.

Update Nov 28: Sadly the @Guggenheim Ow.ly link has now now fails since I changed my Blog URL a few days ago not realizing previous incoming links would fail. I did however get a hefty 1,000 very appreciated hits before the change.

 

 

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Fantastic Man’s Fantastic Spin

Posted in Art, artists, design, fashion, film, London, Media, music, Photography, Symmetry, Uncategorized, video, video art by petercombe on November 12, 2011

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Produced by the duo Lernert & Sander for Fantastic Man, these hi-definition films give both incredible grace and pure practicality to the art of moving fashion images. Each video grants a spectacular 360° view on a spectacular athlete wearing a spectacular look. Fashion editorials that transcends the still image and makes beautiful and intelligent use of the internet as platform. Figure skater Thomas Naylor performs the camel spin – a number that is executed by extending one leg backwards with the knee held above the level of the hip. The music for these films truly stands out and was custom-made by composer Danny Calvi from London, UK.  The haunting musical scores keep me retuning to these beautifully shot shorts, music one might hear watching a Lars von Trier film.

Below, Lawrence Evans, a runner-up for the 2014 Winter Olympics, performs an upright catch-foot spin.  

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Styling: Jodie Barnes. Camera: Bjorn Bratberg. Grooming: Kenichi at Caren. Styling assistance: Joe Porritt. Grooming assistance: Ellie Gill. Editing: Arno Ouwejan. Production: Serena Noorani. Executive production: Stephen Whelan. Postproduction: The Mill.Five films were produced in all. THE FANTASTIC MAN SERIES BY LERNERT & SANDER won the Best Art Direction Prize at «A Shaded View on Fashion Film» (ASVOFF) held in October at Centre Pompidou in Paris. ASVOFF includes a film selection & competition, documentaries, features and installations. 

Andrey Bogush, Sandwich on Plate with Flowers, 2011

Posted in Art, art criticism, artists, Ceramics, Collage, cut & paste, Photography, pictures, Prints, Symmetry by petercombe on October 30, 2011

Andrey Bogush, Sandwich on Plate with Flowers, 2011

 

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Andrey Bogush’s work above has been selected among 4 other artist’s works as finalists for the Still/Life contest at Foam Fotografie Museum, Amsterdam. I like Andrey’s work and have featured it before. In addition to a refined sense of colour, there is an underlying current of the macabre found lurking beneath the surface of much of his work. I can’t figure out whether an element of Andrey’s original artistic approach is geographically based or educationally influenced. Perhaps it is both. Andrey was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia and educated at Saimaa University of Applied Sciences, Imatra, Finland.

Samuel M. Steward’s Neatly Organized Stud File

Posted in collecting, collections, habits, humour, new york times, Photography, poetry, Symmetry, Work on Paper by petercombe on April 14, 2011

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Back in February The New York Times wrote about a website called Things Organized Neatly, a Tumblr site that features a piece of my art. On any given day the site may feature an image of white socks on a blue background, on another, a patterned stack of tires or a careful arrangement of baseball bats. The site is overseen by a young Indianapolis designer named Austin Radcliffe, who seems less intent on collecting objects than on collecting images of collections. His site started less than a year ago, but since being written about in The Guardian and elsewhere, it has gained a following in the tens of thousands.

In 2010, The New York Times Books section featured “Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artist, and Sexual Renegade”. The book by Justin Spring, examines the life of Samuel Steward, left, an English professor, novelist and tattoo artist who documented gay life in the middle decades of the 20th century. During his research, Mr. Spring discovered that Steward, who died in 1993, left behind 80 boxes full of drawings, letters, photographs, sexual paraphernalia,  manuscripts and other items. Among the artifacts was “a green metal card catalog (above photo) labeled ‘Stud File,’ which contained a meticulously documented record on index cards of every sexual experience and partner — Rock Hudson, Thornton Wilder, ‘One-eyed Sadist’ — that Steward said he had had over 50 years.”

A month or so ago I submitted the above photo to thingsorganizedneatly.tumblr.com. Sadly, it appears that the joke was lost on Austin Radcliffe. 

Credit: The Estate of Samuel M. Steward

Judith Ann Braun, Symmetrical Procedures

Posted in Art, Graphite Drawings, Symmetry, Work on Paper by petercombe on July 20, 2010

1, GCN-19-3, (Lanternals), Graphite on paper, 19 x 19″, 2007
2, Oh May I #3, (Texts), Graphite on Duralar, 25 x 25″, 2009
3, BKI-13-1, (Portals), Graphite on paper, 13 x 13″, 2009

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“Symmetrical Procedures”, begun in 2003, is an ongoing series of drawings constrained by four rules: Abstraction, Bilateral Symmetry, Square Format, and Graphite. Abstraction keeps the images free to be anything, while the symmetry resolves that fluidity into something, like when liquid energy crystallizes. This metaphor is reflected also in the soft carbon medium I use, which under heat and pressure becomes a diamond. I like to think I’m drawing with diamond dust. Working within constraints actually prompts infinite possibilities and a self-organizing system of groups and subgroups evolves. Within this confluence of the unintentional and the deliberate, I edit and refine the drawings in search of simple poetic articulations that seem to me, to be both significant and mysterious.

Judith Ann Braun

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